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I announced this on twitter a while back, but tomorrow I'm flying out to Nara Japan. I'll be out there all week for ICFP and all that jazz. It's been about a decade since last time I was in the Kansai region, and I can't wait. As I've done in the past, if you want to meet up for lunch or dinner, just comment below (or shoot me a tweet, email, etc).

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Over the last few weeks I was interviewed for the Identity Function. The process was quite nice and got me thinking on a number of things. Some of them I may well flesh out into blog posts once I get the time. Of course, that likely won't be until the autumn given everything else going on the next couple months.

I'll be in New York from 28 June through 10 July. The first couple days are for a PI meeting, then I'll get a four-day weekend before LICS, NLCS, and LOLA. Originally the plan was to take a quick trip to Sacramento that weekend for a friend's wedding. (The wedding's still on, but plans changed.) At least this way I'll get a chance to relax, rather than running all over the place. Of course this also means I'll be spending the 4th in NYC. Historically the 4th has been one of my favorite holidays, because it was one I've always spent with friends. I don't know that any of my readers are in NYC, but if you'll be around drop me a line. Or if you used to live there and know fun things to do that weekend, let me know! (Especially any quiet end-of-Pride things.)

Me and L set the date for our final move to the Bay Area: 20 July. And then I start at Google on the 25th. Between now and then: dissertating!!

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It's official, I'm heading to Google at the end of July to work with Mark Larson on the Chrome OS security team (of all things!). Seems an unlikely match, but Mark was pretty keen on my background (including the gender stuff!) and wasn't put off by my fusion of linguistics, type-theory, constructive logic/maths, et al. I guess the security team is more concerned with semantic models and constructive correctness than the other teams I talked with. Makes sense, I suppose, but it's sad that these are still thought of as "security" concerns rather than "everything in programming" concerns.

I'm totally looking forward to it, but I am still thinking of it as a bit of an experiment. I'm an academic at heart, so I could see myself heading back to academia in a few years. (Wanting to be a professor is, afterall, what motivated me to start gradschool in the first place.) Then again, I've never really thought of industry as being interested in the sorts of theory I work on. In any case, I'll still be around at the various conferences I've been frequenting; I won't just disappear into industry.

I know a bunch of y'all are in the bay area. I'd love to hear any pointers you have on apartment hunting or on what neighborhoods (nearish Mt View) are nice— i.e., places an artistic disabled radical queer woman might like. Feel free to comment below or get in touch by email, twitter, etc.

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The next week+ I'll be in St. Petersburg Florida for PEPM, PADL, POPL, PPS, and PPAML PI (also CPP and OBT). Would've mentioned it sooner, but it's a bit of a last minute thing. I love reconnecting with old friends and meeting new folks, so feel free to come say hi. If you want to meet up for dinner or such, leave a comment with when/where to find you, or just look for the tall gal with the blue streak in her hair.

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In the spirit of Brent's post, I figure I'll make a public announcement that I'm in Vancouver all week attending HOPE, ICFP, and the Haskell Symposium. I love reconnecting with old friends, as well as meeting new folks. Even if I've met you at past ICFPs, feel free to re-introduce yourself as ...things have changed over the past few years. I know I've been pretty quiet of late on Haskell cafe as well as here, but word on the street is folks still recognize my name around places. So if you want to meet up, leave a comment with when/where to find you, or just look for the tall gal with the blue streak in her hair.

Unlike Brent, and unlike in years past, I might should note that I am looking to "advance my career". As of this fall, I am officially on the market for research and professorship positions. So if you're interested in having a linguistically-minded constructive mathematician help work on your problems, come say hi. For those not attending ICFP, you can check out my professional site; I need to fix my script for generating the publications page, but you can find a brief background/research statement there along with the other usuals like CV, recent projects, and classes taught.

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These past few weeks I've been hacking up a storm. It's been fun, but I need to take a break. One of the big things I learned last fall is that I really need to take breaks. I was good about it all spring, but this summer I've been slipping into my old ways. Those workaholic ways. And when it gets that way, too often coding begins to feel like ripping out a piece of my soul. Or, not ripping. Purging. Whatever. In any case, not good. I much prefer the euphoric sorts of hacking sprees, where spilling my art out into the world feels more like a blessing, like gift giving, like spilling my heart does. So yeah. If it's not like that, then I need to take a break.

The last couple days I've been watching Sense8, which is amazing. It's been a long time since I've given anything five starts in Netflix. I've been watching some cool stuff, been giving lots of fours, but not fives. So yeah, total five star work. The Wachowskis are amazing. I never got all super into the Matrix like everyone else —I mean the first movie was fun and all— but yeah, between Jupiter Ascending and Sense8, they're just awesome. Should prolly see their rendition of Cloud Atlas; but I dunno if it could really live up to the book.

Speaking of breaks, and furies of activity: I'm flying out to Portland on saturday, will be there for a week. Then, when I get back I'm going to WOLLIC/CoCoNat for a week. And then, towards the end of the following week I start the interview process at Google. Then there's a couple weeks of calm before flying off to ICFP. And after that, I need to dig into the dissertation again. Really, I should be working on it now, but like I said: other coding has been eating at my brain. Really need to get it just squared away and out the door. Can't wait to fly off to Mountain View or wherever else is next in life.

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This summer I've been working on optimizing compilation for a linear algebra DSL. This is an extension of Jeremy Siek's work on Built-to-Order BLAS functions. Often times it's more efficient to have a specialized function which fuses two or more BLAS functions. The idea behind BTO is that we'd like to specify these functions at a high level (i.e., with liner algebra expressions) and then automatically perform the optimizing transformations which have made BLAS such a central component of linear algebra computations.

The current/prior version of BTO already handles loop fusion, memory bandwidth constraints, and more. However, it is not currently aware any high-level algebraic laws such as the fact that matrix multiplication is associative, addition is associative and commutative, transposition reverse-distributes over multiplication, etc. My goal is to make it aware of these sort of things.

Along the way, one thing to do is solve the chain multiplication problem: given an expression like ∏[x1,x2...xN] figure out the most efficient associativity for implementing it via binary multiplication. The standard solution is to use a CKY-like dynamic programming algorithm to construct a tree covering the sequence [x1,x2...xN]. This is easy to implement, but it takes O(n^3) time and O(n^2) space.

I found a delicious alternative algorithm which solves the problem in O(n*log n) time and O(n) space! The key to this algorithm is to view the problem as determining a triangulation of convex polygons. That is, we can view [x0,x1,x2...xN] as the edges of a convex polygon, where x0 is the result of computing ∏[x1,x2...xN]. This amazing algorithm is described in the tech report by Hu and Shing (1981a), which includes a reference implementation in Pascal. Unfortunately the TR contains a number of typos and typesetting issues, but it's still pretty legible. A cleaner version of Part I is available here. And pay-walled presumably-cleaner versions of Part I and Part II are available from SIAM.

Hu and Shing (1981b) also have an algorithm which is simpler to implement and returns a heuristic answer in O(n) time, with the error ratio bounded by 15%. So if compile times are more important than running times, then you can use this version as well. A pay-walled version of the article is available from Elsevier.

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The Real Science Gap

If you're anything like me, you've heard tale of the shortage of American scientists and the failing standards of our education system for decades. This article offers a detailed rebuttal of the party line. The problem isn't too few talented individuals, they say, it's too few career prospects and a grist mill devoted to the exploitation of young scientists. This certainly reflects my experiences, both at a top research university and at a more vocational state school. I've always been more motivated by intellectual challenges than monetary rewards (in contrast to many of my colleagues), but it's always unsettling to look up at the house of cards. Will I actually be able to make a career of the research I so enjoy, or is this just a brief respite from the drudgery of a work-a-day programming job?
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